Winter Star Party on Big Pine Key

    By Saundra Amrhein

    Jeff Struve had driven more than 1,000 miles, from Iowa to Big Pine Key, to see it.

    After setting up his four telescopes and two observatory tents, Struve waited for the sun to set.

    Spread out above him was a scene that would keep him awake with excitement until 3:30 the next morning – a scene that draws stargazers to Florida from as far away as Germany, Scotland and England.

    Winter Star Party

    The starry night sky at Camp Wesumkee on Scout Key.

    Chris Zuppa for VISIT FLORIDA

    Evening Sunset at Big Pine Key

    A photographer captures the evening sunset before the nightly show during the annual Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Willie J. Allen Jr. for VISIT FLORIDA

    Winter Star Party near Big Pine Key

    Telescopes await the night sky during the Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Chris Zuppa for VISIT FLORIDA

    Star Gazers in Big Pine Key

    Jim Rose of Miami uses a filter to view the sun's chromosphere and gas erupting from its surface during the Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Chris Zuppa for VISIT FLORIDA

    “I’ve never seen a sky like this before,” said 59-year-old Struve, as the bright white light of Jupiter shone on one side of the horizon, Venus and Mars on the other, and in between right overhead, the Orion constellation, brilliant and radiant like thousands of tiny headlights against the black carpet of night.

    “I just couldn’t believe it,” Struve said.

    While Florida is known to many as a popular travel destination for its white-sand beaches, its bevy of wildlife and its world-famous theme parks, thousands of amateur astronomers treasure it for something else: one of the best places on the planet to gaze at the stars and planets.

    That is particularly true near Big Pine Key, about 35 miles northeast of Key West, and where the Southern Cross Astronomical Society of Miami holds its annual Winter Star Party in February.

    For most of its 31 years, the Winter Star Party has been at Camp Wesumkee on Scout Key just east of Big Pine Key – a location that makes for optimal stargazing for several key reasons, says Winter Star Party event director Tim Khan.

    The “dark sky” location means there is minimal light pollution from urban areas.

    Its latitudinal position near the most southern point of the United States allows for great views of constellations such as the Southern Cross, Carina and Vela, and objects like Omega Centauri and Eta Carinae that are difficult if not impossible to see from northern states and countries.

    The “steady seeing” through the calm air of the Keys makes for transparent and detailed viewing of the planets and stars – whose lights shine steadily without the twinkling caused elsewhere by atmospheric turbulence.

    “We don’t want to see stars that twinkle,” Khan said.

    The combination of these factors – plus Florida’s normally pleasant winter temperatures and nearby attractions – draws up to 600 amateur astronomers and family members or friends to the Winter Star Party every year, Khan said.

    “It’s while people up in the north are freezing,” Khan said.

    Tim Schepis looks uses a filtered telescope to view a solar prominence - a gaseous loop - on the sun during the Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Tim Schepis looks uses a filtered telescope to view a solar prominence - a gaseous loop - on the sun during the Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Willie J. Allen Jr. for VISIT FLORIDA

    Annual Star Watch Party at Big Pine Key

    Astronomers and their families listen to speakers and check raffle winners during the annual Southern Cross Astronomical Society Star Watch Party at Scout Key.

    Chris Zuppa for VISIT FLORIDA

    During the day stargazers cover their canon-sized telescopes, attend lectures about history or astronomy technology that are held amid the tents, campers, park benches, palm trees, silver Airstreams and other RVs.

    Past speakers have included astronauts and empoyees of NASA. A special camp and education sessions are held for children and young astronomers.

    Guests also leave the campgrounds to go kayaking, sailing and snorkeling or to visit Key West.

    For his part, Struve planned to visit some of Florida’s other popular attractions on his trip, including the Kennedy Space Center.

    But for the moment, he was plenty busy tracking the dome of constellations above him.

    “We see the Milky Way at home,” he said, adding that from that vantage point it was nothing more than a smudgy cloud. “Here it’s stars.”

    Brad Hoehne, 46, from Ohio, positioned his camera to capture the fronds of palm trees with Venus in the background. Hoehne – who drove down with bird-watching friends, stopping at a birder park near Clearwater Beach on the way – has been to other star parties. This was his first time to the Winter Star Party. He was amazed by the steady air that allowed him to get a great look through the scopes at the details of Jupiter’s moons.

    But just as he was talking, the silver outline of another beauty caught his attention – accented by two nearby white dots signifying Mars and Venus.

    “Look at the moon!” Hoehne called out, scrambling for his camera.

    In that cry was the excitement that recalled a common childhood discovery among the stargazers here – the beauty of the universe overhead – and, at least in many parts of Florida, one that shines so spectacularly, if we just look up to notice.

    Stargazing in Big Pine Key

    Chris Zuppa for VISIT FLORIDA

    See Stars from Big Pine Key

    Willie J. Allen Jr. for VISIT FLORIDA

    If you go…

    To get a great view of the stars from other Florida vantage points popular with amateur astronomers, check out these additional sites:

    For more about Florida amateur astronomy clubs, check out this list.

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